Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

Common causes of behaviour usually associated with a change in lifestyle or environment

 

Our pets tell us how they are feeling by exhibiting different behaviours and demeanours which are signals we notice. Sometimes they are very noticeable, others may be less so, when perhaps we think or say to others “they don’t look themselves”. This change in behaviour is the point at which we should take notice to help them overcome their uneasy feelings. It’s important to remember that every animal is different, this includes their responses to the changes they experience e.g. a new baby or person in the family may give rise to behaviour in cats such as staying out longer or soiling in the house. When dogs are in kennels, it’s not uncommon for them to exhibit pacing and excessive barking which gives rise to them going home with a hoarse bark. Any change from their normal environment could result in them not managing to adapt. Cats are more likely to show how they feel by ‘withdrawal behaviours’ such as hiding and lessening interaction with family members.

Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for dogs

Start

Teaching appropriate behavioural responses such as toileting in appropriate places, by encouraging and praising the behaviour when the dog/puppy toilets in the desired area and IGNORING the behaviour when the animal toilets in an inappropriate place.

Using more hand signals and fewer words to improve communication cues.

Creating a safe resting place, somewhere where they will not be disturbed by incoming and outgoing visitors into your home.

 

Stop

All kinds of punishment.

Reinforcing your pet's behaviour e.g. initiating cuddling or stroking the dog when it is shaking and nervous, although if they come to you for comfort first you should give them gentle attention.

Signals that trigger responses to difficult situations such as tugging the lead on meeting other dogs. Giving involuntary warning signs, such as pulling on the lead when you see another dog, alerts your dog that there may be a problem.

Reacting yourself - your behavioural response may transfer to your dog, they are easily influenced by your emotions.

 

Downloadable Guides Free guides for specific situations your pet may need help coping with:

 

The downloadable guides give techniques you can use to help. For further information and more detail, contact your vet or an accredited behaviourist.

 

Download Fireworks Guide Download New Pet Guide

Download Travel Guide Download Holiday Guide

Download New Baby Guide Download Kennels/Cattery Guide

Download Moving Home Guide

Signs that may indicate that your cat isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for Cats

Start

Environmental enrichments – these are activities which aim to give pets a more diverse interest in their everyday lives such as:

 

Encouraging play and interaction with toys. Engage cats with ‘chase–and–pounce’ type games or mobiles which move and reflect light.

Different ways of feeding which replicate their natural instinctive behaviour.

Providing multiple feeding places.

• Thinking in 3D – cats use different levels in the house.

• Using feeding regimes that replicate hunting.

• Hiding small amounts of food.

• Small frequent meals are better than one or two.

 

Stop

• Punishment of any kind.

• Forced contact; this applies to human and other animals, cats notably prefer contact to be little and often and on their terms.

 

 

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All they need is love & Zylkène

Common causes of behaviour usually associated with a change in lifestyle or environment

 

Our pets tell us how they are feeling by exhibiting different behaviours and demeanours which are signals we notice. Sometimes they are very noticeable, others may be less so, when perhaps we think or say to others “they don’t look themselves”. This change in behaviour is the point at which we should take notice to help them overcome their uneasy feelings. It’s important to remember that every animal is different, this includes their responses to the changes they experience e.g. a new baby or person in the family may give rise to behaviour in cats such as staying out longer or soiling in the house. When dogs are in kennels, it’s not uncommon for them to exhibit pacing and excessive barking which gives rise to them going home with a hoarse bark. Any change from their normal environment could result in them not managing to adapt. Cats are more likely to show how they feel by ‘withdrawal behaviours’ such as hiding and lessening interaction with family members.

Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for dogs

Start

Teaching appropriate behavioural responses such as toileting in appropriate places, by encouraging and praising the behaviour when the dog/puppy toilets in the desired area and IGNORING the behaviour when the animal toilets in an inappropriate place.

Using more hand signals and fewer words to improve communication cues.

Creating a safe resting place, somewhere where they will not be disturbed by incoming and outgoing visitors into your home.

 

Stop

All kinds of punishment.

Reinforcing your pet's behaviour e.g. initiating cuddling or stroking the dog when it is shaking and nervous, although if they come to you for comfort first you should give them gentle attention.

Signals that trigger responses to difficult situations such as tugging the lead on meeting other dogs. Giving involuntary warning signs, such as pulling on the lead when you see another dog, alerts your dog that there may be a problem.

Reacting yourself - your behavioural response may transfer to your dog, they are easily influenced by your emotions.

 

Signs that may indicate that your cat isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for Cats

Start

Environmental enrichments – these are activities which aim to give pets a more diverse interest in their everyday lives such as:

 

Encouraging play and interaction with toys. Engage cats with ‘chase–and–pounce’ type games or mobiles which move and reflect light.

Different ways of feeding which replicate their natural instinctive behaviour.

Providing multiple feeding places.

• Thinking in 3D – cats use different levels in the house.

• Using feeding regimes that replicate hunting.

• Hiding small amounts of food.

• Small frequent meals are better than one or two.

 

Stop

• Punishment of any kind.

• Forced contact; this applies to human and other animals, cats notably prefer contact to be little and often and on their terms.

 

 

Common causes of behaviour usually associated with a change in lifestyle or environment

 

Our pets tell us how they are feeling by exhibiting different behaviours and demeanours which are signals we notice. Sometimes they are very noticeable, others may be less so, when perhaps we think or say to others “they don’t look themselves”. This change in behaviour is the point at which we should take notice to help them overcome their uneasy feelings. It’s important to remember that every animal is different, this includes their responses to the changes they experience e.g. a new baby or person in the family may give rise to behaviour in cats such as staying out longer or soiling in the house. When dogs are in kennels, it’s not uncommon for them to exhibit pacing and excessive barking which gives rise to them going home with a hoarse bark. Any change from their normal environment could result in them not managing to adapt. Cats are more likely to show how they feel by ‘withdrawal behaviours’ such as hiding and lessening interaction with family members.

Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for dogs

Start

Teaching appropriate behavioural responses such as toileting in appropriate places, by encouraging and praising the behaviour when the dog/puppy toilets in the desired area and IGNORING the behaviour when the animal toilets in an inappropriate place.

Using more hand signals and fewer words to improve communication cues.

Creating a safe resting place, somewhere where they will not be disturbed by incoming and outgoing visitors into your home.

 

Stop

All kinds of punishment.

Reinforcing your pet's behaviour e.g. initiating cuddling or stroking the dog when it is shaking and nervous, although if they come to you for comfort first you should give them gentle attention.

Signals that trigger responses to difficult situations such as tugging the lead on meeting other dogs. Giving involuntary warning signs, such as pulling on the lead when you see another dog, alerts your dog that there may be a problem.

Reacting yourself - your behavioural response may transfer to your dog, they are easily influenced by your emotions.

 

Signs that may indicate that your cat isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for Cats

Start

Environmental enrichments – these are activities which aim to give pets a more diverse interest in their everyday lives such as:

 

Encouraging play and interaction with toys. Engage cats with ‘chase–and–pounce’ type games or mobiles which move and reflect light.

Different ways of feeding which replicate their natural instinctive behaviour.

Providing multiple feeding places.

• Thinking in 3D – cats use different levels in the house.

• Using feeding regimes that replicate hunting.

• Hiding small amounts of food.

• Small frequent meals are better than one or two.

 

Stop

• Punishment of any kind.

• Forced contact; this applies to human and other animals, cats notably prefer contact to be little and often and on their terms.

 

 

Downloadable Guides Free guides for specific situations your pet may need help coping with:

 

The downloadable guides give techniques you can use to help. For further information and more detail, contact your vet or an accredited behaviourist.

Download Fireworks Guide Download New Pet Guide

Download Travel Guide Download Holiday Guide

Download New Baby Guide Download Kennels/Cattery Guide

Download Moving Home Guide

Common causes of behaviour usually associated with a change in lifestyle or environment

 

Our pets tell us how they are feeling by exhibiting different behaviours and demeanours which are signals we notice. Sometimes they are very noticeable, others may be less so, when perhaps we think or say to others “they don’t look themselves”. This change in behaviour is the point at which we should take notice to help them overcome their uneasy feelings. It’s important to remember that every animal is different, this includes their responses to the changes they experience e.g. a new baby or person in the family may give rise to behaviour in cats such as staying out longer or soiling in the house. When dogs are in kennels, it’s not uncommon for them to exhibit pacing and excessive barking which gives rise to them going home with a hoarse bark. Any change from their normal environment could result in them not managing to adapt. Cats are more likely to show how they feel by ‘withdrawal behaviours’ such as hiding and lessening interaction with family members.

Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for dogs

Start

Teaching appropriate behavioural responses such as toileting in appropriate places, by encouraging and praising the behaviour when the dog/puppy toilets in the desired area and IGNORING the behaviour when the animal toilets in an inappropriate place.

Using more hand signals and fewer words to improve communication cues.

Creating a safe resting place, somewhere where they will not be disturbed by incoming and outgoing visitors into your home.

 

Stop

All kinds of punishment.

Reinforcing your pet's behaviour e.g. initiating cuddling or stroking the dog when it is shaking and nervous, although if they come to you for comfort first you should give them gentle attention.

Signals that trigger responses to difficult situations such as tugging the lead on meeting other dogs. Giving involuntary warning signs, such as pulling on the lead when you see another dog, alerts your dog that there may be a problem.

Reacting yourself - your behavioural response may transfer to your dog, they are easily influenced by your emotions.

 

Signs that may indicate that your cat isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for Cats

Start

Environmental enrichments – these are activities which aim to give pets a more diverse interest in their everyday lives such as:

 

Encouraging play and interaction with toys. Engage cats with ‘chase–and–pounce’ type games or mobiles which move and reflect light.

Different ways of feeding which replicate their natural instinctive behaviour.

Providing multiple feeding places.

• Thinking in 3D – cats use different levels in the house.

• Using feeding regimes that replicate hunting.

• Hiding small amounts of food.

• Small frequent meals are better than one or two.

 

Stop

• Punishment of any kind.

• Forced contact; this applies to human and other animals, cats notably prefer contact to be little and often and on their terms.

 

 

Common causes of behaviour usually associated with a change in lifestyle or environment

 

Our pets tell us how they are feeling by exhibiting different behaviours and demeanours which are signals we notice. Sometimes they are very noticeable, others may be less so, when perhaps we think or say to others “they don’t look themselves”. This change in behaviour is the point at which we should take notice to help them overcome their uneasy feelings. It’s important to remember that every animal is different, this includes their responses to the changes they experience e.g. a new baby or person in the family may give rise to behaviour in cats such as staying out longer or soiling in the house. When dogs are in kennels, it’s not uncommon for them to exhibit pacing and excessive barking which gives rise to them going home with a hoarse bark. Any change from their normal environment could result in them not managing to adapt. Cats are more likely to show how they feel by ‘withdrawal behaviours’ such as hiding and lessening interaction with family members.

Signs that may indicate that your dog isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for dogs

Start

Teaching appropriate behavioural responses such as toileting in appropriate places, by encouraging and praising the behaviour when the dog/puppy toilets in the desired area and IGNORING the behaviour when the animal toilets in an inappropriate place.

Using more hand signals and fewer words to improve communication cues.

Creating a safe resting place, somewhere where they will not be disturbed by incoming and outgoing visitors into your home.

 

Stop

All kinds of punishment.

Reinforcing your pet's behaviour e.g. initiating cuddling or stroking the dog when it is shaking and nervous, although if they come to you for comfort first you should give them gentle attention.

Signals that trigger responses to difficult situations such as tugging the lead on meeting other dogs. Giving involuntary warning signs, such as pulling on the lead when you see another dog, alerts your dog that there may be a problem.

Reacting yourself - your behavioural response may transfer to your dog, they are easily influenced by your emotions.

 

Signs that may indicate that your cat isn’t coping

 

The behaviours listed here may also be a sign of a medical condition, therefore it would be wise to discuss these changes with your veterinary surgeon, who will be able to advise you as to the appropriate course of action. For medical causes this may involve different products and include behaviour management techniques.

 

Recommendations for Cats

Start

Environmental enrichments – these are activities which aim to give pets a more diverse interest in their everyday lives such as:

 

Encouraging play and interaction with toys. Engage cats with ‘chase–and–pounce’ type games or mobiles which move and reflect light.

Different ways of feeding which replicate their natural instinctive behaviour.

Providing multiple feeding places.

• Thinking in 3D – cats use different levels in the house.

• Using feeding regimes that replicate hunting.

• Hiding small amounts of food.

• Small frequent meals are better than one or two.

 

Stop

• Punishment of any kind.

• Forced contact; this applies to human and other animals, cats notably prefer contact to be little and often and on their terms.